FOD Information and Prevention - What is FOD?

Foreign Object Debris (FOD) is a substance, debris or article alien to a vehicle or system which would potentially cause damage.

Foreign Object Damage (also abbreviated FOD) is any damage attributed to a foreign object (i.e. any object that is not part of the vehicle) that can be expressed in physical or economic terms and may or may not degrade the product's required safety or performance characteristics.

FOD is an abbreviation often used in aviation to describe both the damage done to aircraft by foreign objects, and the foreign objects themselves.[1][2]

"Internal FOD" is used to refer to damage or hazards caused by foreign objects inside the aircraft. For example, "Cockpit FOD" might be used to describe a situation where an item gets loose in the cockpit and jams or restricts the operation of the controls.

"Tool FOD" is a serious hazard caused by tools left inside the aircraft after manufacturing or servicing. Tools or other items can get tangled in control cables, jam moving parts, short out electrical connections, or otherwise interfere with safe flight. Aircraft maintenance teams usually have strict tool control procedures including toolbox inventories to make sure all tools have been removed from an aircraft before it is released for flight. Tools used during manufacturing are tagged with a serial number so if they are found they can be traced.

The "Damage" term was prevalent in military circles, but has since been pre-empted by a definition of FOD that looks at the "debris". This shift was made "official" in the latest FAA Advisory Circulars FAA A/C 150/5220-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Detection Equipment' (2009) and FAA A/C 150/5210-24 'Airport Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Management'.

Eurocontrol, ECAC, and the ICAO have all rallied behind this new definition. As Iain McCreary of Insight SRI put it in a presentation to NAPFI (August 2010), "You can have debris present without damage, but never damage without debris." Likewise, FOD prevention systems work by sensing and detecting not the damage but the actual debris.

Thus FOD is now taken to mean the debris itself, and the resulting damage is referred to as "FOD damage".

Internationally, FOD costs the aviation industry US$13 billion per year in direct plus indirect costs.

The indirect costs are as much as ten times the indirect cost value, representing delays, aircraft changes, incurred fuel costs, unscheduled maintenance, and the like for a total of $13 billion per year[3] and causes expensive, significant damage to aircraft and parts and death and injury to workers, pilots and passengers.

It is estimated that FOD costs major airlines in the United States $26 per flight in aircraft repairs, plus $312 in such additional indirect costs as flight delays, plane changes and fuel inefficiencies.[4]

"There are other costs that are not as easy to calculate but are equally disturbing," according to UK Royal Air Force Wing Commander and FOD researcher Richard Friend.[5] "From accidents such as the Air France Concorde, Flight AF 4590,[6] there is the loss of life, suffering and effect on the families of those who died, the suspicion of malpractice, guilt, and blame that could last for lifetimes.

This harrowing torment is incalculable but should not be forgotten, ever. If everyone kept this in mind, we would remain vigilant and forever prevent foreign object debris from causing a problem. In fact, many factors combine to cause a chain of events that can lead to a failure."

In the United States, the most prominent gathering of FOD experts has been the annual National Aerospace FOD Prevention Conference. It is hosted in a different city each year by National Aerospace FOD Prevention, Inc. (NAFPI), a nonprofit association that focuses on FOD education, awareness and prevention.

Conference information, including presentations from past conferences, is available at the NAFPI Web site.[2] However, NAFPI has come under some critique as being focussed on tool control and manufacturing processes, and other members of the industry have stepped forward to fill the gaps.

BAA hosted the world's first airport-led conference on the subject in November 2010

To find out more about the specifics and examples of FOD and FOD Damage please go here courtesy of wikipedia.org


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Canadian Jobs for Aerospace

Prime Minister of Canada announces a new project to create jobs and improve training in aerospace and healthcare sectors

The Government of Canada is making smart, ambitious investments to help Canadians get the skills, training, and opportunities they need to thrive in the global economy and succeed in the workforce, now and into the future.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced an investment of $150 million to CAE through the Strategic Innovation Fund. With this investment, CAE will harness the power of artificial intelligence, cloud computing, big data, and augmented and virtual reality to develop the next generation of simulation and training products.

This funding will secure a $1 billion investment in research and development in Canada. It will help CAE create 400 new engineering and manufacturing jobs over the next five years, and retrain 1,700 employees with new digital skills. This will allow the company to fully transform its products and operations with cutting-edge digital technology.

CAE will develop new simulation tools and training programs with the latest technologies, making sure Canadian professionals in the aerospace and healthcare sectors get the skills they need and the most relevant training possible.

Quotes

“Today’s announcement is about creating high-skilled jobs in Canada today, while making sure Canada’s next generation of pilots, engineers, doctors, and nurses have access to some of the most advanced simulation tools and training programs in the world. With this funding, CAE will continue to raise the bar for training standards, from the cockpit to the operating room, and help drive the success of Canada’s aerospace industry.”
—The Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

“Aerospace is one of the most innovative industries in Canada. Our government’s investment in CAE will help maintain Canada’s global leadership in a sector critical to our economy. Canadians will benefit from more middle class jobs, more skills training opportunities, and innovative new products thanks in part to this investment.”
—The Hon. Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Quick Facts

  • CAE is a global leader in training for the aerospace and healthcare sectors, and the world’s leading supplier of flight simulators. Established in 1947, CAE has offices in 18 locations, and employs approximately 4,000 people across the country.
  • Canada’s aerospace industry includes 700 firms, contributes close to $12.6 billion in GDP to Canada’s economy, and employs more than 85,000 Canadians.
  • CAE will invest $1 billion in research and development by 2023, retrain 1,700 employees with new digital skills, and collaborate with 50 post-secondary institutions and research centres across Canada.
  • The Government of Canada’s contribution to CAE includes an unconditionally repayable investment of $140 million and a non-repayable investment of $10 million.
  • The Strategic Innovation Fund is a $1.26 billion program to support research, development, and commercialization of new products that pave the way for Canada as a global innovation leader and attract investments that create jobs. The Government of Canada launched the Strategic Innovation Fund in Budget 2017 to ensure Canada remains a top destination for businesses to invest, grow, and create jobs.

Original Post can be found here

https://pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2018/08/08/prime-minister-announces-new-project-create-jobs-and-improve-training-canadas

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